Liens de la semaine (weekly)

  • tags: communities, communitymanagement, onlinecommunities, communitybuilding

  • Social software provides an answer to the ‘why’ question. It is a means of giving people what they want in terms of their traditional knowledge management activities, in a way that also benefits the firm.

    tags: socialmedia, knowledgemanagement, contribution, networks, socialnetworks

  • Those trying to read the tea leaves about Enterprise 2.0 these days can see that the software at least has arrived in a bare majority of companies, even if it’s just Facebook or Twitter across the firewall. Genuine adoption and meaningful integration into business processes has certainly happened in a number of organizations, but is still the edge case today rather than the rule. That’s not to say the current case studies aren’t reporting gains, they generally are. But the message here is that many enterprises are now actively in full contact with the social computing world, whether they want to or not, and now it’s time to understand how to deal with the benefits and issues.

    tags: enterprise2.0, adoption, socialcomputing, framework, bestpractices, communitymanagement, costs, trust, risk, bottomup, topdown, control

  • If the ongoing social networking revolution has you scratching your head and asking, “Why do people spend time on this?” and “How can my company benefit from the social network revolution?” you’ve got a lot in common with Harvard Business School professor Mikolaj Jan Piskorski

    tags: socialnetworks, usages, socialmedia, socialstrategy, strategy, networks, offlinenetworks, marketing

    • “Online social networks are most useful when they address real failures in the operation of offline networks,” says Piskorski.
    • Corporate marketers by and large struggle with how to use social networking sites to reach potential customers, says Piskorski, who advises companies on this subject. The problem is that execs think of online social networks as social media and treat it as another channel to get people to click through to a site.
    • “To be successful, you need to shift your mindset from social media to social strategy,”
    • I see (businesses) saying, ‘Let’s talk to people on Twitter or let’s have a Facebook page or let’s advertise.’ And these are good first steps but they are nowhere close to a social strategy
  • tags: socialbusiness, socialbusinessstratregy, strategy, socialcrm, customers, clients, innovation, marketing, alignment, operations

  • L’assureur américain Chubb Group of Insurance correspondait sans aucun doute, récemment, à  cette lugubre description. Voici quelques mois, cependant, le groupe s’est lancé dans une nouvelle expérience, raconte le magazine Rick & Insurance, visant à  insuffler durablement un esprit d’innovation dans toutes les strates de l’organisation.

    tags: chubb, innovation, crowdsourcing, openinnovation

    • Trente jour après l’installation de la plate-forme en ligne, l’assureur avait récolté 607 idées.
      « Certaines de ces idées tenaient sur un email de trois paragraphes, rapporte l’article de R&I. D’autres idées étaient bien plus longuement développées. Elles renvoyaient à  des documents annotés des commentaires. Nous en sommes sûr: beaucoup de ces idées vivotaient depuis de nombreuses années dans le cerveau de certains employés. Ils voulaient les soumettre mais ils n’avait personne pour les entendre et nul par où les exprimer. Elles étaient perdues€¦ »
    • « Je sais que je peux partir d’une graine d’idée et, en trois mois, btir tout un business plan. Et je dispose des fonds pour soutenir la mise en oeuvre. De la sorte, je suis armé pour devancer n’importe qui« , précise Jon Bidwell, Chief Innovation Officer de Chubb Group of Insurance, à  R&I.
  • During our Insight Event last week, Steve Perry (Head of Knowledge and Business Development Systems) discussed Freshfields’ new social intranet and the changing shape of business processes in the firm through the use of social tools. These are my notes from Steve’s talk along with his presentation.

    tags: socialintranet, intranet2.0

  • During our Insight Event last week, Sam Dimond (Director of Knowledge Systems) outlined his thoughts on how to get started with social tools, drawing from his experience of the adoption of blogs and wikis in Clifford Chance.

    tags: enterprise2.0, cliffordchance, adoption, implementation, email, collaboration, wiki

  • Significant changes are taking place in management and especially project management today. We hear that organizations, like the New York Times, Tribune Co., Ernst & Young switched from the so-called top-down management style to bottom-up management. Others, including some of the world’s biggest corporations, such as Toyota and IBM, implemented bottom-up management style elements in some of their departments. The popularity of the bottom-up approach to management is growing. In spite of this fact, the discussions about the two major approaches are still hot. Why have organizations become so anxious about changing their management style? If we compare the two management approaches, the answer to this question will be clear.

    tags: projectmanagement, topdown, bottomup, management, project, participation, collaboration, enterprise2.0, projectmanagement2.0, collectiveintelligence

    • . Team members are invited to participate in every step of the management process. The decision on a course of action is taken by the whole team. Bottom-up style allows managers to communicate goals and value, e.g. through milestone planning. Then team members are encouraged to develop personal to-do lists with the steps necessary to reach the milestones on their own.
    • These methods include are Enterprise 2.0 technologies €“ wikis, blogs, social networks, collaboration tools, etc. They come into organizations and change the original way of executing projects. They turn traditional project management into Project Management 2.0 and bring new patterns of collaboration, which are based on collective intelligence. Collective intelligence is a collection of valuable knowledge from different fields that each project team member is an expert in. This knowledge is now successfully collected and shared shared in a flexible, collaborative environment brought by second-generation project management software. The project manager is the one to conduct the work of his team and choose the right direction for the project development, based on the information received from the individual employees.
  • This is the third in a series of interviews with Samuel Driessen, Information Architect at Océ, about their Enterprise 2.0 implementation and adoption experiences.

    tags: océ, implementation, informationarchitecture, information, informationmanagement, structuredinformation, unstructuredinformation, integration

    • The information architecture is the glue that bonds business and IT components and it looks at both structured and unstructured information. The unstructured information can give context to the structured information.
    • In the past Océ could clearly distinguish the tools R&D and Manufacturing & Logistics (M&L) use. Only when data was transferred from R&D tools to M&L tools a joint responsibility existed. However, this led to silos and inefficiency. Now M&L needs more access, commitment and collaboration from R&D to be able to organize M&L in such a way to reduce such factors as lead time. There is a common product cycle management tool to help with this.
  • Why do some companies succeed at transformation while others fail? Is it the methods they choose, such as lean manufacturing, Six Sigma and business process reengineering? Maybe it’s that old bugaboo, a lack of “leadership commitment.” If so, then why has no one come up with a way to measure, predict or replicate the critical factors that make transformations succeed?

    tags: change, transformation, leadership, complexity, people, ATKearney

  • Your oldest and youngest talent cohorts demand many of the same things in a workplace€”and have the numbers to get their way.

    tags: generationy, babyboomers

    • More important, Boomers and Gen
      Ys are together redefining what constitutes a great place to work. As we
      will show, they tend to share many attitudes and behaviors that set them
      apart from other generations. These shared preferences constitute a new
      center of gravity for human resources management.
  • tags: digitaldistraction, distraction, attention, socialmedia

  • Sometimes even the best researchers forget that the answer you get depends entirely on who you ask. A new Forrester survey of 2,000 information workers has revealed that despite the hype, it’s not Gen Y that’s getting business to adopt collaborative technology. Gen X, those who are 30-43, are the ones leading the charge for social computing.

    tags: humanresources, generationx, generationy, adoption, influence, socialmedia

    • Forrester’s analysis is that despite their different view of technology, Gen Y, Millennials, or whatever you want to call those 29 and under, don’t yet have the clout within organizations to make real change.
    • Even if Gen Y was significantly better at using social software, it wouldn’t matter at this point. Obviously younger employees will increase their stature within organizations as the years pass. But the idea of Millennials at the vanguard of innovation in the enterprise is a myth
  • In my talks with innovation leaders on this, the issues evolve around the funnel system and stage-gate like models; how to identify the ideas and get them from one stage to the next. Another key issue is how you organize for this. It is my experience that companies often make a couple of mistakes on this. They are:

    tags: innovation, processes, openinnovation, ideas, ideasmanagement

    • 1. Too much focus on internal sources
    • 2. Too much focus on ideas and too little on processes and people
    • 3. No filtering process in place
    • 4. Processes are too complex
  • Le modèle du KWC (Knowledge Workers Community) propose 4 phases dans le cycle de vie d’une communauté. Cela signifie, dans le cas d’une communauté de connaissance ou d’une communauté d’intérêt, qu’il ne suffit absolument pas de créer un outil et d’auto-déclarer une communauté, mais bien d’organiser des rencontres pour aller vers une phase de formalisation, qui elle même repose sur des échanges

    tags: communities, KWN, knowledgeworkers, communitiesofinterest

    • Là  ou la communauté de pratique va concevoir la veille (étape 3) comme une phase intermédiaire (phase 3) au service de la constitution de communauté, dans la communauté marketing la veille est  l’objet de la communauté.
    • Là  ou la communauté de pratique va concevoir la veille (étape 3) comme une phase intermédiaire (phase 3) au service de la constitution de communauté, dans la communauté marketing la veille est  l’objet de la communauté.
    • Là  ou la communauté de pratique va concevoir la veille (étape 3) comme une phase intermédiaire (phase 3) au service de la constitution de communauté, dans la communauté marketing la veille est  l’objet de la communauté.
    • Là  ou la communauté de pratique va concevoir la veille (étape 3) comme une phase intermédiaire (phase 3) au service de la constitution de communauté, dans la communauté marketing la veille est  l’objet de la communauté.
    • Là  ou la communauté de pratique va concevoir la veille (étape 3) comme une phase intermédiaire (phase 3) au service de la constitution de communauté, dans la communauté marketing la veille est  l’objet de la communauté.
    • Là  ou la communauté de pratique va concevoir la veille (étape 3) comme une phase intermédiaire (phase 3) au service de la constitution de communauté, dans la communauté marketing la veille est  l’objet de la communauté.
    • Là  ou la communauté de pratique va concevoir la veille (étape 3) comme une phase intermédiaire (phase 3) au service de la constitution de communauté, dans la communauté marketing la veille est  l’objet de la communauté.

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.