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    Leading companies have passed through three distinct phases of organizational usage. What should we learn from them? « 

    tags: socialbusiness enterprisesocialnetwork collaboration

    • We found that overall adoption is plateauing
    • Social-networking sites (such as Facebook and LinkedIn) and microblogging platforms (such as Twitter and Yammer) remain the tools of choice in the pursuit of broad communication and collaboration.
    • the adoption of blogging as a leadership-messaging tool leveled off.
    • Wikis have had less impact historically, and their use has stalled
    • We also found clear evidence that social networks have expanded and become better integrated, with companies first moving to interact with customers, then creating networks linking both employees and outside stakeholders.
    • Companies in our study that have tried to set strategic priorities from the bottom up report a flattening of management hierarchies and in some cases deeper employee involvement through allocation of resources using social-voting mechanisms.
  • « Strategy and collaboration are key to implementing a digital workplace, Gartner analyst Bob Hafner said during a presentation at the 2016 Gartner CIO & IT Executive Summit on June 16.

    Rather than simply assigning a vaguely defined tech-related project to the IT department, the C-suite needs to develop a concrete strategy involving multiple departments working together, with someone – ideally the CIO – taking the lead, he said. »

    tags: digitalworkplace workpersonas

    • “Right now the biggest obstacle most companies face in implementing a digital workplace is they haven’t built a strategy, and they don’t have somebody responsible for it, because it spans so many department
    • “The only place all of those areas come together is at the CEO level, and it’s not something the CEO is going to do,”
    • We figure that right now, 15 per cent of organizations have a leader for the digital workplace, 35 per cent of organizations are looking at it, and 50 per cent of you are just worried about what the next version of the product you already have installed is.”
    • 1. Engage your employees as people first

      One of the most important elements of implementing a digital workplace is to think of the employer/employee relationship from both sides

    • 2. Approach work as a collaborative environment

      Without a digital workplace there is little collaboration between enterprise departments, Hafner admitted, because few see the need for it.

    • Hafner illustrated his lesson using another case study, which developed profiles for nine employees and evaluated their strengths and weaknesses to ensure they collaborated well in groups.
    • 3. Reimagine workplace technology

      To build workplace technology that people will use, Hafner said, you need to approach it like consumer technology.

    • 4. Set realistic goals

      In one of his slides Hafner shared an anonymous organization’s near-term goals, which included the consolidation of multiple technology platforms; the development of electronic user profiles; enhanced mobile and wireless infrastructure; and integrated services.

  • Although there’s still a long way to go, Deloitte’s new Global Human Capital Trends report shows that HR is now making impressive strides in innovation, reskilling, and adapting to changing workforce and business demands.

    So how can HR take the lead in this exciting digital business world? Where are the best opportunities to drive business growth? What capabilities and skills will be needed in the future?

    tags: humanresources employeeexperience experience designthinking

    • Although there’s still a long way to go, Deloitte’s new Global Human Capital Trends report shows that HR is now making impressive strides in innovation, reskilling, and adapting to changing workforce and business demands.

       

      So how can HR take the lead in this exciting digital business world? Where are the best opportunities to drive business growth? What capabilities and skills will be needed in the future?

    • 79% of executives in this year’s Global Human Capital Trends survey rated design thinking – which puts the employee experience at the center – an “important” or “very important” issue (see figure 1)
    • In simple terms, design thinking means focusing on the person and the experience, not the process. The key question that HR needs to ask is: “what does a great employee experience look like from end to end?
    • Done well, design thinking promotes a virtuous cycle: generating higher levels of employee satisfaction, greater engagement, and higher productivity for the company.
  • « Now, thanks to machine learning algorithms, it’s becoming possible for smart software to scrutinize data from a variety of sources — sensors on machines or changes in supply chains, for instance — and redesign processes in real time. »

    tags: machinelearning businessprocess businessprocessdesign bpm casestudies

    • 96% of respondents agreed or strongly agreed that machine learning is automating process-change management inside their organization
    • Smartface is testing embedded sensors and smart workstations in car-making plants to create a kind of self-adapting assembly line that can modify the steps in its process to fit the demands of various automotive features. Rather than an end-to-end assembly line, cars shuffle in optimized, nonlinear paths among reprogrammable stations that flexibly perform tasks for building a car to specification.
    • A company called Sight Machine has developed machine-learning analytics to solve a variety of problems in complex assembly lines. The software can spot hidden problems in existing processes and optimize quality in products.
    • More than two-thirds of our respondents noted that machine learning has sped up the delivery of physical products at least 2x, and 9% of organizations saw a 10x improvement.
    • Even data collected after products are produced can be useful for processes learning how to fix themselves. For example, sensors on planes can monitor aircraft parts, and tire manufacturers can monitor wear and tear on tires from afar.

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.