Liens de la semaine (weekly)

  • tags: IBM socialsoftware value businessvalue ROI metrics measurement

  • « Social has its own Pareto rule: 90-9-1 versus the old-fashioned 80-20. It means that 1% of people creates content, 9% curates it, and the remaining 90% is consuming it. That’s not a very homogeneous group, is it? Yet, when it comes to paying the bill, all of them are considered equal. »

    tags: socialsoftware pricing pareto use microblogging

    • Normally, you only pay for what you use. We all have stuff in the house we purchased once because we thought we needed it, and hardly or even never touched it since. Heck, maybe some of that is still even gift-wrapped or unpacked. But none of us have ever payed for something we then knew wouldn’t need.
    • You might also reverse the model (slightly going crazy now, apologising up front): users who contribute most will be free from charge, users who contribute least will be charged more €“ that will get out a really valuable knowledge pool, won’t it? Or will it just increase the volume and drag down the value?
  • « Detail: In general, the first wave of Enterprise 2.0 was arguably tool-based (e.g., stand-alone blogs, wikis). The second wave of Enterprise 2.0 focused on enabling an enterprise-wide destination (e.g., a “Corporate Facebook”) which acted as a community and connectivity hub for employees. More accurately, we might describe this type of platform as a social network site (Reference Architecture For Social Network Sites). The third wave of Enterprise 2.0 is moving in two directions virtually in parallel to each other. »

    tags: enterprise2.0 applications platform services socialnetworks businessapplications integration processcentricity workflow sociallayer

    • The initial direction is to support social applications hosted on the social network site itself. The most common examples I’ve seen so far are innovation/ideation solutions but organizations will likely want to construct their own community-like applications on top of their social network site as well.
    • This horizontal trend is the second direction within this third wave of Enterprise 2.0 implementations. Social networking services will enable organizations to take social data within the social network site and surface that information contextually within another system (e.g., productivity suites, collaboration tools, enterprise portals, business processes, and mobile applications).
    • The recent discussions within the Enterprise 2.0 community have indicated that E2.0 should have greater process-centricity (e.g., integration with CRM, ERP, supply chain, etc). This type of pragmatic approach is more doable as vendors in this space prioritize API’s to integrate « social » into the flow of work and adding a social layer as many have argued.
  • « Hear Gartner Research Vice President Jim Sinur discuss how case processing addresses today’s business drivers. Discover the greatest opportunity for case management and the technologies you can use to develop case-based solutions faster. »

    tags: casemanagement adaptivecasemanagement process bpm unstructuredprocesses compositeprocesses knowledgeworkers dynamicprocesses economics agility dynamism casedbasedprocessing

  • « Amy talks about how five principles of game mechanics (collecting, points, feedback, exchanges and customization) can be combined with three trends of social media (accessibility, recombination, syndication) to design fun yet functional software applications. »

    tags: software applications games gaming

    • Here are the five game design principles Amy talks about €“

      – Collecting: Players love to collect artifacts and complete sets.
      – Points: Players love to be rewarded with points from the game itself or from other users. Points can be used for leveling up, for creating leaderboards, or for redemption for gifts.
      – Feedback: Players love to get feedback from the game itself or from other users. Feedback can be about how they are doing against others, or even against themselves over time.
      – Exchanges: Players love to engage in exchanges with other players. Exchanges can take the form of explicit trading or implicit gifting.
      – Customization: Players love to customize their character or profile, and also their interface or dashboard.

    • Here are the three social media trends Amy talks about €“

      – Accessible: Social applications are becoming more accessible because of simpler user interfaces, but also across devices, often enabled by open APIs.
      – Recombinant: The data from social applications can be combined into different types of activity streams.
      – Syndicated: The data from social applications can be exported and showcased elsewhere using RSS feeds and widgets.

  • « A growing number of companies known for their hard-nosed approach to business€”such as GE, Google, IBM, Intel, Johnson & Johnson, Nestlé, Unilever, and Wal-Mart€”have already embarked on important efforts to create shared value by reconceiving the intersection between society and corporate performance. Yet our recognition of the transformative power of shared value is still in its genesis. Realizing it will require leaders and managers to develop new skills and knowledge€”such as a far deeper appreciation of societal needs, a greater understanding of the true bases of company productivity, and the ability to collaborate across profit/nonprofit boundaries. And government must learn how to regulate in ways that enable shared value rather than work against it. »

    tags: socialbusiness socialresponsability sharedvalue capitalism value products market nonprofits profit competitiveadvantage socialentrepreneur clusters

    • A growing number of companies known for their hard-nosed approach to business€”such as GE, Google, IBM, Intel, Johnson & Johnson, Nestlé, Unilever, and Wal-Mart€”have already embarked on important efforts to create shared value by reconceiving the intersection between society and corporate performance. Yet our recognition of the transformative power of shared value is still in its genesis. Realizing it will require leaders and managers to develop new skills and knowledge€”such as a far deeper appreciation of societal needs, a greater understanding of the true bases of company productivity, and the ability to collaborate across profit/nonprofit boundaries. And government must learn how to regulate in ways that enable shared value rather than work against it.
    • The concept of shared value resets the boundaries of capitalism. By better connecting companies’ success with societal improvement, it opens up many ways to serve new needs, gain efficiency, create differentiation, and expand markets.
    • Intel and IBM are both devising ways to help utilities harness digital intelligence in order to economize on power usage. Wells Fargo has developed a line of products and tools that help customers budget, manage credit, and pay down debt. Sales of GE’s Ecomagination products reached $18 billion in 2009€”the size of a Fortune 150 company. GE now predicts that revenues of Ecomagination products will grow at twice the rate of total company revenues over the next five years
    • For a company, the starting point for creating this kind of shared value is to identify all the societal needs, benefits, and harms that are or could be embodied in the firm’s products.
    • Today there is a growing consensus that major improvements in environmental performance can often be achieved with better technology at nominal incremental cost and can even yield net cost savings through enhanced resource utilization, process efficiency, and quality.
    • Energy use and logistics.

      The use of energy throughout the value chain is being reexamined, whether it be in processes, transportation, buildings, supply chains, distribution channels, or support services

    • Resource use.

      Heightened environmental awareness and advances in technology are catalyzing new approaches in areas such as utilization of water, raw materials, and packaging, as well as expanding recycling and reus

    • Today some companies are beginning to understand that marginalized suppliers cannot remain productive or sustain, much less improve, their quality.
    • Distribution.

      Companies are beginning to reexamine distribution practices from a shared value perspective. As iTunes, Kindle, and Google Scholar (which offers texts of scholarly literature online) demonstrate, profitable new distribution models can also dramatically reduce paper and plastic usage

    • Today leading companies have learned that because of lost workdays and diminished employee productivity, poor health costs them more than health benefits do
    • Location.

      Business thinking has embraced the myth that location no longer matters, because logistics are inexpensive, information flows rapidly, and markets are globa

    • No company is self-contained. The success of every company is affected by the supporting companies and infrastructure around it. Productivity and innovation are strongly influenced by “clusters,” or geographic concentrations of firms, related businesses, suppliers, service providers, and logistical infrastructure in a particular field€”such as IT in Silicon Valley, cut flowers in Kenya, and diamond cutting in Surat, India.
    • Shared value holds the key to unlocking the next wave of business innovation and growth. It will also reconnect company success and community success in ways that have been lost in an age of narrow management approaches, short-term thinking, and deepening divides among society’s institutions.
    • The concept of shared value can be defined as policies and operating practices that enhance the competitiveness of a company while simultaneously advancing the economic and social conditions in the communities in which it operates. Shared value creation focuses on identifying and expanding the connections between societal and economic progress.

    • Not all societal problems can be solved through shared value solutions. But shared value offers corporations the opportunity to utilize their skills, resources, and management capability to lead social progress in ways that even the best-intentioned governmental and social sector organizations can rarely match. In the process, businesses can earn the respect of society again.
    • There are numerous ways in which addressing societal concerns can yield productivity benefits to a firm. Consider, for example, what happens when a firm invests in a wellness program. Society benefits because employees and their families become healthier, and the firm minimizes employee absences and lost productivity. The graphic below depicts some areas where the connections are strongest.
    • Creating shared value (CSV) should supersede corporate social responsibility (CSR) in guiding the investments of companies in their communities. CSR programs focus mostly on reputation and have only a limited connection to the business, making them hard to justify and maintain over the long run. In contrast, CSV is integral to a company’s profitability and competitive position. It leverages the unique resources and expertise of the company to create economic value by creating social value
  • « Using social media tools may be a good way to nip some bad PR in the bud when there are consumer revolts over service problems. And it can’t hurt to have a high level executive show that the company is listening to consumer complaints. »

    tags: socialmedia customerservice socialcrm quality

    • Yet there doesn’t seem to be much of a connection between having customer service reps actively engaged on Twitter, for example, and better customer service results.  
    • The bottom line is that harnessing every trendy social media tool on the web won’t make much of a difference as long as most customers still have to deal with inneffective call centers and email forms. 
  • « Le partage des données confidentielles sur votre entreprises navigue désormais sans que vous puissiez mettre la main sur celui qui a distribué les infos, sans que vous puissiez agir contre€¦c’est un nouvel état de fait sur lequel vous n’avez pas la main.

    Il n’y a pas 1 source ou tout est concentré, vos données sont partout sur la toile (et si ce n’est pas encore le cas, vous devez désormais agir comme tel) et tout le monde (chacun de vos employés, partenaires qui auraient accès aux données) peut partager et diffuser.

    Ne pensez pas que cela soit anecdotique, « the bank of america » a déjà  perdu 3% de sa valeur sur la simple rumeur que des informations seraient divulguées sur cette dernière. »

    tags: wikileaks transparency communication e-reputation

    •  1.  Identifiez vos zones de risque : ce qui s’est passé à  Vegas ne restera pas à  Vegas… 

      Regardez tout d’abord quelles sont les pratiques dans votre entreprise, le type de données numérique (email en particulier) qui circulent et comment sont décrits les salariés, les concurrents, les consommateurs. 

    • 2. Pensez d’abord excuses et réformes plutôt que « persécution »

      La réaction majoritaire que nous avons vu de la part des politiques ou des militaires aux sorties de WIkileaks ont principalement été de dire qu’ils allaient poursuivre Assange en justice (ce qu’ils font d’ailleurs).

      Mais ce type de réponse ne peut pas fonctionner et on attend d’une entreprise qu’elle soit responsable.

    • 3. Suivez l’opinion de vos salariés -Vous êtes aussi faible que le plus faible de vos maillons

      Historiquement la sécurité a toujours été centrée sur les risques provenant de l’extérieur mais désormais les entreprise sont totalement poreuses.

      Personnes ne va voler de documents, ils vont « simplement » les rendre publiques.

    • La ventilation des budgets (90% de la com va à  la publicité et au point de vente) devrait être complètement revue pour prioriser sur des démarches beaucoup plus éthiques (puisqu’il ne servira plus à  rien de faire des jolies pub si la réalité vous rattrape), de la veille, de la gestion de crise€¦

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