• « Drawing directly on our experience of working with organisations on social intranet, social platform and ESN projects at every level of maturity, I have pulled out some of the key characteristics of more advanced ‘post-adoption’ thinking below. »

    tags: enterprisesocialnetworks maturity implementation adoption socialplatform culture organization processes leadership

    • Strategy & Leadership

       

      Yes, we all agree having leadership on board to give support to platform adoption is a very good thing; but just getting the CEO sharing an occasional blog post is not enough

    • Processes

       

      Some processes can be re-factored altogether using social tools; others should not be changed, but rather supported and surrounded by social interaction. Either way, integrating and embedding social behaviours in the key processes of the organisation is one of the best ways to give your platform a key role in the firm.

    • Culture & Organisation

       

      Coupling culture with organisational design helps define an operational view of a connected company:

    • Technology

       

      It is easy to get caught up in technology-first thinking and valuing features over outcomes. A clear hallmark of a more mature approach is that discussions around technology focus squarely on the enablement of business actions, rather than the ‘features and benefits’ of the technology itself. They can be limited to areas such as:

  • « According to Carl Benedict Frey and Michael A. Osborne, two researchers at Oxford who researched 702 current occupations, approximately half (47 percent) are at risk of going the way of the telephone operator within just a decade or two. »

    tags: machines artificialintelligence middlemanagement

    • But whereas those earlier revolutions complemented human (and horse) muscle, the new one will replace human cognition, in that computers will ultimately do work that involved employing people to do information-processing tasks.
    • When will we come to the point where we can automate jobs that are highly cognitive and non-routine, such as managers? Guess what: We already are.
    • These companies are now employing armies of human workers, optimizing their output, productivity and quality while driving prices down – all without managers to direct those who are performing the jobs. “Management” is almost completely done by machines and algorithms.
    • The software layer between the company and their armies of contractors dispatches a human to perform a particular job or task with a very prescriptive level of detail that ensures consistent and measurable execution while effectively eliminating middle management
    • While this opens up a whole new world of possibilities and opportunities for new ways of doing business, it really begs the question for those of us who are in management roles.
  • Providing a great experience for customers has become a credo for many companies today. They realize that a great end-to-end experience will attract and retain customers, as well as engage the enthusiasm and creativity of employees. Customers still want a wireless plan, auto insurance policy or a mortgage with the right features at the right price, but increasingly they also expect at least a convenient, and possibly special, experience surrounding the product or service. And they want interactions to be seamless across physical and digital channels.

    tags: customerexperience

    • 2. Which handful of actions will generate the most impact with our target customers?
    • Providing a great experience for customers has become a credo for many companies today. They realize that a great end-to-end experience will attract and retain customers, as well as engage the enthusiasm and creativity of employees. Customers still want a wireless plan, auto insurance policy or a mortgage with the right features at the right price, but increasingly they also expect at least a convenient, and possibly special, experience surrounding the product or service. And they want interactions to be seamless across physical and digital channels.
    • Bain & Company analysis shows that companies that excel in the customer experience grow revenues 4%–8% above their market.
    • To create an experience that can truly delight customers and then sustain the effort by making steady improvements requires senior executives to commit to a marathon, not a sprint.
    • 1. What do we want to stand for in the eyes of our customers?

       

      The first task is to articulate the distinctive value proposition that the company will offer to customers—and then to mobilize people throughout the organization around that proposition.

    • 2. Which handful of actions will generate the most impact with our target customers?
    • Experience leaders sift through early initiatives to identify those that work well, reinforce the vision and deserve more resources, while avoiding or quickly ending initiatives that don’t matter to most target customers.
    • 3. How can we use customer feedback to promote learning and behavior change among employees?
    • People with clarity about their mission—and who receive positive and helpful reinforcement for doing the right thing—go the extra mile to deliver. Mobilizing and harnessing employees’ energy requires two types of feedback loops deployed continuously
    • 4. When we put ourselves in the customer’s shoes, what aspects of the experience need to change?
    • With technology and competitive dynamics moving so quickly these days, leading companies don’t hesitate to completely rethink customer experiences by, for example, incorporating new digital channels and features.
    • Effective experience design works outside in from the customer’s perspective, not inside out from an engineering standpoint.
    •  

      5. How can we anticipate and mitigate the risks, in order to sustain the changes?

    • Senior leaders committed to building a superior customer experience will need an achievable plan that can be delivered while carrying on with day-to-day business.
  •  » Lorsque la menace concurrentielle ne semble pas encore directe, la tentation est forte de parler de transformation digitale plutôt que de la faire. Mais aujourd’hui, beaucoup d’entreprises ont peur d’être « uberisées » : ne rien faire peut les mettre en position de faiblesse face à des innovations disruptives. Qu’Airbnb vaille plus qu’Accor, ou que les banques voient dans Apple une menace, en dit long sur le sujet. »

    tags: digitaltransformation change

    • Le premier enjeu est stratégique : le risque de substitution de l’activité traditionnelle par une offre numérique, les nouveaux modèles économiques, les gains potentiels de compétitivité, la question de la diversification, la création de nouveaux écosystèmes et partenariats…
    • Il y a ensuite des enjeux marketing, autour du changement de comportements des clients, du mode de communication avec eux,
    • Enfin, il y a un enjeu organisationnel, en raison de la remise en cause des processus internes, des nouveaux modes de travail, de l’agilité, du recrutement et de l’intégration des « digital natives », et enfin du renforcement des compétences.
    • La transformation digitale n’est pas principalement une affaire de technologie, mais bien de stratégie, de marketing et d’organisation.
    • Dans les grands groupes, il y a tout d’abord un risque sur la marque. Car l’agilité, le « try and error », des produits pas vraiment finis qui s’améliorent, etc. c’est très efficace pour l’innovation, mais ça peut être périlleux quand on est une grande marque.
    • Le risque est lié aussi au coût du changement organisationnel : avant de se lancer dans ces combats internes, on veut être sûr que c’est vraiment important, voire – dans certaines entreprises – inévitable
    • La difficulté est qu’un manager est payé pour ne pas échouer, alors que l’échec fait partie de la vie de l’entrepreneur.
    • C’est finalement curieux de voir que l’échec est un sujet tabou dans l’entreprise, qu’on ne sait pas le gérer, alors que la gestion de l’échec devrait être une partie intégrante de toute politique d’innovation.
    • J’ai néanmoins le sentiment que, si on veut transformer, il faut, comme dans tout changement, une implication directe et non ambiguë de la Direction Générale.
    • Je suis convaincu qu’il faut accepter une certaine dose d’illégalité par rapport aux règles internes

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