#Unleash18 Day 1 : My Wrap-Up

Sharing is caring!

Since yesterday I am at #Unleash18 in Amsterdam. Later on, there will come finer and more transversal analyses of what I have learned, but for those who can’t wait, here’s a quick summary of what I have done, seen and heard today.

HR Technology 2019: Disruptions Ahead / Josh Bersin (Deloitte)

A conference on HR technologies without Bersin is a bit like a council of ministers without the President: something is missing. Josh Bersin gave us a preview of his 2019 report on HR technologies, which is expected to be released by the end of the year.

On the form he did Bersin-like stuff : 10 interesting ideas per minute so hard to follow and take notes at the same time. I note some strong trends.

1°) As a continuation of previous years, HR is entering the era of performance and not only talent management. Nothing new, therefore, which makes me maintain my usual reservations about HR as the only owner of the subject.

 

2°) On the other hand, Bersin introduces the notion of “HR in the flow of work” which is interesting. HR is all the time, in the background, integrated into all business activities and not activities or tasks that occur outside the workflow. He said, “imagine what it would be like…” so…. it’s still to be imagined.

3°) Everyone wants to position themselves on the “Core HR”. He has identified 1600 vendors on the market but thinks that there are actually more than 3000. And everyone wants to be there, from the usual suspects like IBM, SAP or Oracle to newcomers like Google, Facebook, Salesforce and of course Linkedin. The reasons behind this gold rush will deserve a specific article later on.

 

4°) All this creates a very fragmented application landscape. Companies have an average of 11 HR systems and that’s a lot. And the buyer of HR technology must transform himself into a watchman and an analyst, which is time-consuming and requires large teams.

5°) In this landscape Linkedin really makes a noticeable entry with an increasingly complete offer and walks on the boards of pure players.

6°) The installation of the employee experiend as a major subject leads to a transformation of the HRIS architecture.

 

7°) In a world where unemployment is at its lowest, recruitment is becoming a growth issue. How to grow when there is no one to recruit or when you close your borders.

In short, the Bersin style : interesting, rich and dense.

Working Human in the Digital Age /Andrew Keen

ANdrew Keen is the author of books such as “the cult of the amateur”, “Internet is not the answer” and more recently “how to fix the future” and it is precisely this last book that he talked about. In short:

1°) When we started the Internet adventure in the 90s we thought that it would unleash humans.

2°) Today we realize that it didn’t work. We do not work less, we do not go home earlier, it has even increased the workload. The major web platforms, on the other hand, build a capitalist architecture that uses us, monetizes us, exploits us. The opposite of being human. And with the arrival of AI, the future of jobs is at best very worrying.

3°) Humans must take back their future in hand if they want what they have as human to continue to exist in the world and the businesses of tomorrow.

4°) That involves innovation, education and regulation.

We know Andrew Keen for his anything but positive speech about technology, a little like Evgeny Morozov and in my opinion if the truth is between bliss and scepticism, it is still healthy to wake up the teddy bears. What surprised me the most (or not) was to see the room gradually empty itself throughout its intervention. Lack of interest? Certainly not in my opinion. But people come to find solutions and don’t want to be told about the problems that go with it. Tell them that not only will they have to adopt the technology, but they will also have to be wary of it. Too bad because, to make the link with the beginning of this article, when they will have given their Core HR to Google it will be too late to say “we didn’t know”.

From brick and mortar to a digital recruitment organisation / Gilles Stephan, Talent Acquisition Director PVH Europe – Tommy Hilfiger – Calvin Klein

A very practical case study on how to move from brick-and-mortar to digital recruitment. The pivot point is of course the use of data.

Nothing more to say than that HR is gradually taking over marketing practices. Data, funnel, conversion, personas, CRM… As I always say if your HR can’t recruit in the digital age, ask your marketing, they know.

 

A number I remember: a candidate takes 8 seconds to read an offer. To meditate on.

Co-creating a Culture that Drives Dare and Care / Niklas Nordling Head of Culture Transformation and OD, Nokia,

The topic was how Nokia took advantage of the Alcatel-Lucent acquisition to co-create a corporate culture. The French, always very self-critical, will appreciate to see that Nokia defined itself as a heavy and rigid company compared to an agile and innovative Alcatel.

An approach based on 3 pillars: respect for values, inclusion and pragmatism.

If the co-creation mechanism, its modalities and the tools used are very interesting (and the data, always the data), I would also have liked to know more about how the “dare and care” works on a daily basis, especially from a managerial point of view.

 

Balancing Two Worlds – a Global Company Player Moving Towards Digitalization and Agility / Jochen Wallisch EVP HR – Head of Industrial Relations & Employment Conditions, Siemens

Here we typically have a reflection on the “future of work” on the part of a company that must digitize itself while making the two models coexist. Indeed, if it is easy to build a digital company, you cannot take an industrial company, stop everything and restart it all again.

He was confronted with the situation that many people know: thinking about a strategic and brilliant program in his office, going to a factory and being told “we don’t have time for this bullshit”.

 

The main part of what I get from it is about pedagogy around a “future of work” type program on the why, the what, the how, by making the whole pragmatic and comprehensible to all populations. Also the need to proactively address the various obstacles such as managers who do not want employees, especially in factories, to give time to a co-construction approach.

At the end I like his remark about the fact that a company can be successful in industry 4.0 and have people 1.7 or 2.3 !

Killing organizational drag: HR as productivity champions. Adoption is the answer. / Nico Orie VP HR Strategy and Operations, Coca-Cola European Partners

Perhaps one of the best presentations I have seen on the employee experience

Everything starts from new employee demands with causes that are now well known: change in the nature and content of work, empowerment of the individual and socio-demographic change.

 

He highlights the fact that the experience used goes well beyond the experience over the systems

 

A programme is put in place with clearly identified strategies: personalization, transparency, authenticity, responsiveness and one thing I systematically insist on and am happy to see here: simplicity.

For something measurable in the end! I really like the idea of giving back a million hours of work to the business!

 

Je suis depuis hier à #Unleash18 à Amsterdam. Plus tard viendront des analyses plus fines et transverses de ce que j’en ai retiré, mais pour les plus pressés un rapide résumé de ce qu’ai fait, vu et entendu ce aujourd’hui.

HR Technology 2019: Disruptions Ahead / Josh Bersin (Deloitte)

Une conférence sur les technologies RH sans Bersin c’est un peu comme un conseil des ministres sans le Président : il manque quelque chose. Josh Bersin nous a donné un avant de son rapport 2019 sur les technologies RH qui devrait sortir d’ici la fin de l’année.

Sur la forme il a fait du Bersin : 10 idées intéressantes à la minute donc dur de suivre en prenant des notes en même temps. Je retiens quelques tendances fortes.

1°) Dans le prolongement des années précédentes les RH rentrent dans l’ère de la performance et pas seulement de la gestion des talents. Rien de neuf donc ce qui me fait maintenir mes réserves habituelles sur les RH comme seuls propriétaires du sujet.

 

2°) Par contre Bersin introduit la notion de “HR in the flow of work” qui est intéressante. Les RH c’est tout temps, en tache de fond, intégré dans toutes les activités métier et pas des activités ou tâches qui se passent en dehors du flux de travail. Il a bien dit “imaginez ce que ça serait…” car effectivement il reste à l’imaginer.

3°) Tout le monde veut se positionner sur le “Core HR”. Il a identifié 1600 éditeurs sur le marché mais pense qu’en fait il y en a plus de 3000. Et tout le monde veut y être, des “usual suspects” IBM, SAP ou Oracle à de nouveaux arrivants comme Google, Facebook, Salesforce et bien sur Linkedin. Les motifs derrière cette ruée vers l’or mériteront un article spécifique en temps utiles.

 

4°) Tout cela crée un paysage applicatif très fragmenté. Les entreprises ont en moyenne 11 systèmes RH et c’est beaucoup. Et l’acheteur de technologie RH doit se transformer en veilleur et en analyste ce qui est chronophage et demande des équipes conséquentes.

5°) Dans ce paysage Linkedin fait vraiment une entrée en force avec une offre de plus en plus complète et marche sur les plates bandes des pure players.

6°) L’installation de l’expérience employé comme un sujet majeur entraîne une transformation de l’architecture du SIRH.

 

7°) Dans un monde où le chômage est au plus bas le recrutement devient un enjeu de croissance. Comment croître quand il n’y a personne à recruter ou qu’on ferme ses frontières .

Bref du Bersin, intéressant, riche et dense.

Working Human in the Digital Age /Andrew Keen

ANdrew Keen est l’auteur de livres comme “Le culte de l’amateur”, “Internet is not the answer ” et plus récemment “how to fix the future” et c’est justement de ce dernier livre qu’il a parlé. En bref :

1°) Quand on s’est lancé dans l’aventure d’internet dans les années 90 on pensait que cela aller être libérateur pour l’humain.

2°) Aujourd’hui on se rend bien compte que ça n’a pas marché. On ne travaille pas moins, on ne rentre pas plus tôt chez nous, cela a même augmenté la charge de travail. Les grandes plateformes du web, au contraire, construisent une architecture capitaliste qui nous utilise, nous monétise, nous exploite. L’opposé d’être humain. Et avec l’arrivée de l’IA le futur des emplois est au mieux très inquiétant.

3°) Il faut que l’humain reprenne son futur en main s’il veut que ce qu’il a d’humain continue à exister dans le monde et l’entreprise de demain.

4°) Une prise en main qui passe par l’innovation, l’éducation et la régulation.

On connait Andrew Keen pour son discours tout sauf béat face à la technologie, un peu comme Evgeny Morozov et à mon avis si la vérité doit être entre béatitude et scepticisme, il est quand même salutaire de réveiller les bisounours. Ce qui m’a le plus surpris (ou pas) c’est de voir la salle se vider progressivement tout au long de son intervention. Manque d’intérêt ? Sûrement pas à mon avis. Mais les gens viennent pour trouver des solutions et ne veulent pas qu’on leur parle des problèmes qui vont avec. Qu’on leur dise que non seulement ils vont devoir adopter la technologie mais aussi s’en méfier. Dommage car, pour faire le lien avec le début de cet article, quand ils auront donné leur Core HR à Google il sera trop tard pour dire “on ne savait pas”.

From brick and mortar to a digital recruitment organisation / Gilles Stephan, Talent Acquisition Director PVH Europe – Tommy Hilfiger – Calvin Klein

Un cas très pratique sur comment passer d’un recrutement à l’ancienne à un recrutement digital. Le point de pivot étant bien entendu l’utilisation de la data.

Rien à dire de plus que les RH sont peu à peu en train de s’approprier les pratiques du marketing. Data, funnel, conversion, personas, CRM… Comme je le dis systématiquement si vos RH ne savent pas recruter à l’ère digitale, demandez à votre marketing, lui il sait.

Un chiffre que je retiens : un candidat prend 8 secondes pour lire une offre. A méditer.

Co-creating a Culture that Drives Dare and Care / Niklas Nordling Head of Culture Transformation and OD, Nokia,

Le sujet était comment Nokia a profité du rachat d’Alcatel-Lucent pour co-recréer une culture d’entreprise. Le français, toujours très auto-critique, appréciera de voir que Nokia se définissait comme une entreprise lourde et rigide par rapport à un Alcatel agile et innovant.

Une démarche articulée sur 3 piliers : respect des valeurs, inclure tout le monde et être pragmatique.

Si le mécanisme de co-création, ses modalités et les outil utilisés sont très intéressants (et la data, toujours la data), j’aurai aimé également en savoir plus sur comment le “dare and care” fonctionne au quotidien, surtout d’un point de vue managérial.

 

Balancing Two Worlds – a Global Company Player Moving Towards Digitalization and Agility / Jochen Wallisch EVP HR – Head of Industrial Relations & Employment Conditions, Siemens

Là on a typiquement une réflexion sur le “futur du travail” de la part d’une entreprise qui doit se digitaliser tout en faisant cohabiter les deux modèles. En effet s’il est facile de construire une entreprise digitale on ne peut prendre une entreprise industrielle, tout arrêter et tout redémarrer.

Il a été confronté à la situation que beaucoup connaissent : réfléchir à un programme aussi stratégique que brillant dans son bureau, aller dans une usine et se faire dire “on a pas le temps pour ces conneries”.

 

L’essentiel de ce que j’en retire est sur la pédagogie autour d’un programme de type “future of work” sur le pourquoi, le quoi, le comment, en rendant le tout pragmatique et compréhensible de toutes les populations. Aussi le besoin de traiter proactivement les différents freins comme les managers qui ne veulent pas que les salariés, surtout dans les usines, donnent du temps à une démarche de co-construction.

A la fin j’aime bien sa remarque sur le fait qu’une entreprise peut avoir des succès en industrie 4.0 et avoir entre des gens 1.7 ou 2.3 !

Killing organizational drag: HR as productivity champions. Adoption is the answer. / Nico Orie VP HR Strategy and Operations, Coca-Cola European Partners

Perhaps one of the best presentations I have seen on the employee experience.
Everything starts from new employee demands with causes that are now well known: change in the nature and content of work, empowerment of the individual and socio-demographic change.

 

It highlights the fact that the experience used goes well beyond the experience over the systems.

 

A programme that is being put in place with clearly identified strategies: personalization, transparency, authenticity, responsiveness and one thing I systematically insist on and am happy to see here: simplicity.

For something measurable in the end! I really like the idea of giving back a million hours of work to the business!

With one last warning: technoloWith one last warning: technology alone is not enough.

That’s all for this first day. Today I’m going to focus more on vendors and the startup scene with a few interviews. Wrap-up tomorrow!

 

Sharing is caring!

Bertrand DUPERRINhttps://www.duperrin.com/english
Head of Employee and Client Experience @Emakina / Former consulting director / Crossroads of people, business and technology / Speaker / Compulsive traveler
172FansJ'aime
12,590SuiveursSuivre

Articles récents